Top Utah General Rifle Elk Hunt Units for 2017

yearling and calf elkI’ve had more questions recently from non-resident elk hunters asking about the Utah General Elk Season.

Utah has plenty of elk and many units are above the population objectives, so why not hunt in Utah?

But not all general units are good bets for hunters not familiar with the territory.

2017 Utah General (OTC) Elk Licenses

The General Elk licenses are sold over the counter (OTC) an online starting at 8 a.m. July 11 (2017). Utah does not use the term OTC like Colorado, but I sometimes use it because OTC is shorter than General Elk Season or General Elk License.

The number of OTC licenses for the Utah Rifle (or Any Legal Weapon; ALW) and Muzzleloader hunts have not been set yet for the 2017 hunting season, but last year they were limited to 29,000. Since they are limited, they are “first come, first serve”. The number of General Archery licenses are unlimited.

The latest available elk harvest and hunter data for Utah was 2015. In 2015 there was a total of 24,335 General Rifle hunters; 11,463 rifle hunters with Any Bull licenses and 12,872 hunted Spike Only units.

By comparison, only 1,360 hunted with muzzleloader in Any Bull Units and 1,092 hunted in Spike Only Units. There were 10,886 General Elk Archery Hunters in all units in 2015.

Utah General (OTC) Rifle Elk Hunts

I’ll start with the General Rifle or ALW hunts first.

If you didn’t already know; in Utah, you have a choice of either the Any Bull Units or the Spike Only units, but not both.

Utah General Elk Hunt not limited to One Unit

Hunters are not limited to one unit, so it is possible to hunt one unit in the morning and another unit in the afternoon. Utah hunters can (and do) hunt more than one unit, which explains why the numbers of hunters in each unit doesn’t match the total hunters in the state.

This ability to hunt more than one unit also affects Hunter Success in each unit. If you hunt more than one unit and did not harvest an elk, you add 0% success to all the different units you hunted. If you did harvest an elk, you would contribute 100% success to one unit, but 0% success to the other units.

Hunter Success also appears low due to the fact that more than half of the hunters (55% total; range 0% – 82.3%) in Spike Only Units also have cow elk (Antlerless) tags. These “Antlerless” tags can be used during any other season as long as the cow elk is taken in the proper unit.

So even if you harvested a cow elk during the general rifle or muzzleloader Bull Elk season, you were still unsuccessful at harvesting a Bull Elk. This is not an issue for Archery hunters since they are allowed to take a bull elk or an antlerless elk with the general license and the success is recorded accordingly.

For example, two years ago, I hunted four of the first five days of the General Elk Season and harvested a cow elk. I did not hunt the remaining eight days of the season because I didn’t need another elk. So, according to the statistics, I was totally unsuccessful after four days of hunting Bull Elk during the General season, yet my freezer was full.

Utah General Any Bull Elk Rifle Units

There are 22 units in Utah where you can hunt with an Any Bull tag during the rifle season. All 22 of these units are ranked by total harvest (Any Bulls) in Table 1.

Table 1. All 22 Utah OTC Rifle Any Bull Units Ranked by Total Harvest 2015

2015 utah general rifle any bull elk harvest

The Any Bull units are those that are not managed for Limited Entry hunts. By total harvest, the units ranged from 375 Bull Elk taken on the South Slope – Yellowstone sub-unit to 0 (zero, zip, zilch, nada, none) elk harvested in four units. Just remember these four units are basically desert habitats that don’t hold many elk.

The top four units are two South Slope Units and two North Slope sub-units that accounted for over half (56.2%) of all Bull Elk harvested in all Any Bull units in Table 1. So without knowing anything else about Elk Hunting in Utah, you should consider the North or South Slope of the Uinta Mountains.

Notice that seven units (hi-lighted) are in the top 10 for both total elk harvested and by hunter success shown in Table 2 below.

My comment above about hunters taking cow elk on separate tags also applies in the Any Bull units.

When the 22 units are ranked by Hunter Success (Table 2), success ranges from 32.3% in the Box Elder – Hansel Mountain sub-units to 0% in the four units without any bull elk harvested.

Table 2. All 22 Utah OTC Rifle Any Bull Units Ranked by Hunter Success 2015

2015 utah general rifle any bull elk success


The Average success for all General Rifle Any Bull units combined is ranked between the 10th and 11th place units at 18.5%.

The Top 10 units ranked by Hunter Success account for just under half (47.8%) of all Bull Elk harvested in all Any Bull units in Table 2.

Again, notice the seven hi-lighted units that were in the top 10 for both total elk harvested and by hunter success.

Utah General Spike Bull Elk Rifle Units

There are 25 units in Utah where you can hunt with Spike Elk (only) tags during the General rifle season. All 25 of these units are ranked by total harvest (Spike Bulls) in Table 3.

Table 3. All 25 Utah OTC Rifle Spike Bull Units Ranked by Total Harvest 2015

2015 utah general rifle spike elk harvest

The Spike Bull units are managed for Mature Bulls by the Utah Division of Wildlife (UDWR) for Limited Entry hunts.

By total harvest, the units ranged from 295 Spike Bulls taken on the Central Mountains – Manti sub-unit to 0 (zero) elk harvested in three units.

The top five units accounted for over half (54.6%) of all Spike Elk harvested in all Spike Elk units in Table 3 and in addition to the Central Mountains – Manti, includes two Wasatch Mountain sub-units and the Book Cliffs unit.

Notice that six units (hi-lighted) are in the top 10 for both total elk harvested and by hunter success shown in Table 2 below.

When the 22 units are ranked by Hunter Success (Table 2), success ranges from 32.3% in the Box Elder – Hansel Mountain sub-units to 0% in the four units without any bull elk harvested.

Table 4 shows the 25 General Rifle Spike Elk units ranked by Hunter Success.

Table 4. All 25 Utah OTC Rifle Spike Bull Units Ranked by Hunter Success 2015

2015 utah general rifle spike elk success

The Average success for all General Rifle Spike Bull units combined is ranked between the 11th and 12th place units at 13.3%.

The Top 11 units ranked by Hunter Success account for just under half (47.8%) of all Spike Elk harvested in all Spike Elk units in Table 2.

Again, notice the six hi-lighted units that were in the top 10 for both total elk harvested and by hunter success.

Why Hunt a Spike only Elk Unit?

Most first time DIY Elk hunters want a chance at a nice bull, but will be happy to harvest a cow. So consider applying for a cow tag (called antlerless license in Utah) so you have that chance. But why should you consider hunting in a Spike Only Unit?

What better way to learn about a unit than to hunt it? If you hunt a spike unit with general tags for many years (or if you hunt several spike units over several years), you will learn which unit you want to apply to get the Limited Entry Tags. I can’t tell you how many mature bulls I have seen while hunting during the general rifle or muzzleloader elk (or mule deer) seasons.

What does it Cost for Non-residents to Hunt Elk in Utah?

You will need a hunting license ($65 for age 18+ and $25 for age 17 and under) and the General Elk License costs $393 (and they throw in a fishing license) for a total of  $458. It  is less expensive to hunt elk with general tags in Utah than other “elk states”, but they don’t cut much of a price break for youth hunters.

Utah Non-Resident Cost for General Season Bull Elk

License/Fee Cost
General Hunting License $ 65
General Bull Elk Permit $393
Total Cost General Bull Elk $458

You will need the Hunting License and it costs $10 to apply for the cow tag and $218 if get one. You will draw a cow tag in Utah about every other year. If you wanted to only hunt Antlerless elk, the total cost (if you drew the tag) would be $293.

Utah Non-Resident Cost for Limited Antlerless Elk

License/Fee Cost
General Hunting License $ 65
Antlerless Application fee $ 10
Limited Entry Antlerless Elk $218
Total Cost Antlerless Elk Only $293

But why not apply for a cow tag as well so you will have a better chance to harvest an elk. The total costs for a General Bull Elk permit and a cow tag will be $686. Archery hunters only need the Bull elk tag to hunt either sex.

Utah Non-Resident Cost for Both General Bull & Limited Antlerless Elk

License Cost
General Hunting License $ 65
General Bull Elk Permit $393
Antlerless Application fee $ 10
Limited Entry Antlerless Elk $218
Total for General Bull & Antlerless Elk $686

Next post will cover the General Archery and Muzzleloader Elk Season.

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